Proposal Title

Planning for Motivation

Presenter Information

Ruth Ronan, Rutgers UniversityFollow

Session Type

Workshop

Session Location

University Hall, ADP Center 1143

Start Date

31-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

31-5-2019 11:00 AM

Key Terms

pedagogy, andragogy, motivation, instructional design, lesson planning, adult learning, ARCS, self-determination theory

Brief Abstract

Motivation plays a central role in the adult learner’s ability to engage in classroom activities. This workshop explores recent findings in self-determination theory and introduces attendees to tools that can help them develop a motivational strategy as part of instructional planning.

Proposal

This workshop will explore three models of motivation theory: self-determination theory promoted by Edward L. Deci; the elements of motivation based on Daniel Pink’s research; and, the ARCS model of motivational design developed by John Keller. It proposes two possible instructional planning approaches – by applying Keller’s ARCS model and by shifting the balance of power proposed by Maryellen Weimer in “Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice.” It also briefly examines student resistance to motivational strategies.

This is a very interactive session. Participants will have an opportunity to collaboratively examine learning situations that increase and decrease motivation using the Socrative app on their mobile devices. They will also consider definitions of the three key components of self-determination theory (autonomy, competence, relatedness) in a think-pair-share activity. The session wraps up with a jigsaw team activity where each group answers three questions to collaboratively craft motivational strategies using the syllabus, in teaching and learning activities, and as part of feedback and assessment.

References

Blumberg, P. (2008). Developing learner-centered teaching: A practical guide for faculty Jossey-Bass.

Deci, E. L., & Flaste, R. (1995). Why we do what we do: The dynamics of personal autonomy. GP Putnam's Sons.

Felder, R. M., & Brent, R. (1996). Navigating the bumpy road to student-centered instruction. College Teaching, 44(2), 43-47.

Keller, J. M. (2000). How to integrate learner motivation planning into lesson planning: The ARCS model approach. VII Semanario, Santiago, Cuba, 1-13.

Keller, J. M. (2009). Motivational design for learning and performance: The ARCS model approach Springer Science & Business Media.

Pink, D. H. (2011). Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us Penguin.

Selfdeterminationtheory.org - an approach to human motivation & personality Retrieved from http://selfdeterminationtheory.org/

TEC-Variety_ch3.pdf Retrieved from http://tec-variety.com/TEC-Variety_ch3.pdf

Weimer, M. (2002). Learner-centered teaching: Five key changes to practice John Wiley & Sons.

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May 31st, 9:00 AM May 31st, 11:00 AM

Planning for Motivation

University Hall, ADP Center 1143

This workshop will explore three models of motivation theory: self-determination theory promoted by Edward L. Deci; the elements of motivation based on Daniel Pink’s research; and, the ARCS model of motivational design developed by John Keller. It proposes two possible instructional planning approaches – by applying Keller’s ARCS model and by shifting the balance of power proposed by Maryellen Weimer in “Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice.” It also briefly examines student resistance to motivational strategies.

This is a very interactive session. Participants will have an opportunity to collaboratively examine learning situations that increase and decrease motivation using the Socrative app on their mobile devices. They will also consider definitions of the three key components of self-determination theory (autonomy, competence, relatedness) in a think-pair-share activity. The session wraps up with a jigsaw team activity where each group answers three questions to collaboratively craft motivational strategies using the syllabus, in teaching and learning activities, and as part of feedback and assessment.

References

Blumberg, P. (2008). Developing learner-centered teaching: A practical guide for faculty Jossey-Bass.

Deci, E. L., & Flaste, R. (1995). Why we do what we do: The dynamics of personal autonomy. GP Putnam's Sons.

Felder, R. M., & Brent, R. (1996). Navigating the bumpy road to student-centered instruction. College Teaching, 44(2), 43-47.

Keller, J. M. (2000). How to integrate learner motivation planning into lesson planning: The ARCS model approach. VII Semanario, Santiago, Cuba, 1-13.

Keller, J. M. (2009). Motivational design for learning and performance: The ARCS model approach Springer Science & Business Media.

Pink, D. H. (2011). Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us Penguin.

Selfdeterminationtheory.org - an approach to human motivation & personality Retrieved from http://selfdeterminationtheory.org/

TEC-Variety_ch3.pdf Retrieved from http://tec-variety.com/TEC-Variety_ch3.pdf

Weimer, M. (2002). Learner-centered teaching: Five key changes to practice John Wiley & Sons.