Proposal Title

Helping students leverage and manage their learning through mobile experiences

Session Type

Workshop

Session Location

University Hall, ADP Center 1143

Start Date

31-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

31-5-2019 11:00 AM

Key Terms

Mobile learning, educational research, learning design, instructional design, design thinking, just-in-time learning

Brief Abstract

The current generation has become increasingly reliant on mobile devices, using them to remain connected, knowledgeable, and social on the go. Undoubtedly, self-management plays an essential role in their life-long learning. How should educational stakeholders take advantages from mobile technology to foster the self-management skills for the emerging generation?

Proposal

Workshop Title:

  • Helping students leverage and manage their learning through mobile experiences


Workshop Length:

  • Our workshop will be approximately 60 minutes long. The structure of the presentation will allow for 40 minutes worth of knowledge sharing and 20 minutes for a hands-on design activity. Any remaining time will be used to continue the conversation on mobile learning and anticipated next steps from the unique perspectives of different educational stakeholders.

Workshop Description:

Main Goal/Objectives:

We can see a strong trend that the emerging generation is increasingly reliant on mobile devices (Pomerantz & Brooks, 2017). Mobile learning has been identified as a promising market for the education industry, as technology improves standards have emerged and the increase of mobile use/devices continues to extend the reach of the education industry (Habboush, Nassuora, & Hussein, 2011).

At the same time, self-management skills play an essential role in their life-long learning. Self-management refers to the extent an individual feels he or she is self-disciplined and can engage in autonomous learning (Smith, Murphy, & Mahoney, 2003). Students who have good self-management skills are more likely to achieve better academic (Duckworth & Seligman, 2005) and occupational (Daly, Delaney, Egan, & Baumeister, 2015; Roberts, Kuncel, Shiner, Caspi, & Goldberg, 2007) success. Research suggests that in order to help learners achieve better mobile learning performance more attention should be given to mobile learning designs that address learners with different levels of self-management (Huang 2014).

This workshop will look to understand, how can we take advantage of the mobile trend and technology to foster learners’ self-management skills? The participants who attend this session can look forward to the following:

  • An overview of the latest student mobile device usage for learning

  • Methods to foster students’ self-management skills

  • Design-based research framework

  • Guidance for mobile application design: benefits and challenges

  • A self-developed mobile solution designed with core learning research and design principles.


Workshop skill-set/ Intended audience:

  • This workshop will be of interest and beneficial to faculty members, instructional and learning designers, educational researchers, and anyone else interested in mobile learning, research, design, and product development in the educational context.
  • In an effort to accommodate for participants with all levels of expertise, our session will include a foundational review of learning design and research in producing effective and meaningful learning experiences.


Workshop Structure & Outline:

  • The workshop will be moderated through a presentation to share fundamental information regarding mobile learning and learning design research. Following the presentation, participants will be asked to participate in an object-based activity.
  • The tentative outline is described below:
    • Introduction of Self-Management Skills and its importance to students’ future success
    • Current State Conversation on Mobile Learning & Student Trends associated with Mobile Use
    • Explanation of the role of research and design in designing effective learning experiences
    • Conversation on the Dos & Don’ts of designing Mobile Learning Experiences
    • Activity to facilitate participants in creating their own mobile learning experience that will support students’ self-management skills
    • Concluded by a candid conversation on what’s next for mobile learning


Workshop Activity/Engagement Plan

  • During the session, participants will be asked to participate in a design activity to create their own mobile learning experience based on a series of learning design principles and research. The activity will take participants through a series of steps, aiding them to think through key questions to facilitate their mobile design (Gipple & Lord, 2013):
    • Who is the target audience?
    • What is your budget?
    • What is the intended purpose of the application?
    • What are the learning use cases and problem statement?
    • What skills are you focusing on?
    • What are the required features aligned to these use cases and problem statements?
    • How will your mobile learning experience help position your target audience for future success?
    • What challenges might you face?
    • How do you plan to address those challenges?


Workshop Materials & Supplies

  • For this workshop, we will require a projector to display our presentation slides. Additionally, we will also supply participants with handouts, markers, and pens to help them in the design activity portion of the session.


References

  • Daly, M., Delaney, L., Egan, M., & Baumeister, R. F. (2015). Childhood self-control and unemployment throughout the life span: Evidence from two British cohort studies. Psychological science, 26(6), 709-723.
  • Duckworth, A. L., & Seligman, M. E. (2005). Self-discipline outdoes IQ in predicting academic performance of adolescents. Psychological science, 16(12), 939-944.
  • Gipple, J., & Lord, E. (2013). Understanding Mobile Learning and Best Practices. ICS Learning Group.
  • Habboush, A., Nassuora, A., & Hussein, A. R. (2011). Acceptance of mobile learning by university students. American Journal of Scientific Research, 22, 119-122.
  • Huang, R. T. (2014). Exploring the moderating role of self-management of learning in mobile English learning.
  • Pomerantz, J., and Brooks, D. C. (2017). ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2017. Research report. Louisville, CO: ECAR, October 2017.
  • Roberts, B. W., Kuncel, N. R., Shiner, R., Caspi, A., & Goldberg, L. R. (2007). The power of personality: The comparative validity of personality traits, socioeconomic status, and cognitive ability for predicting important life outcomes. Perspectives on Psychological science, 2(4), 313-345.
  • Smith, P. J., Murphy, K. L., & Mahoney, S. E. (2003). Towards identifying factors underlying readiness for online learning: An exploratory study. Distance education, 24(1), 57-67.

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May 31st, 9:00 AM May 31st, 11:00 AM

Helping students leverage and manage their learning through mobile experiences

University Hall, ADP Center 1143

Workshop Title:

  • Helping students leverage and manage their learning through mobile experiences


Workshop Length:

  • Our workshop will be approximately 60 minutes long. The structure of the presentation will allow for 40 minutes worth of knowledge sharing and 20 minutes for a hands-on design activity. Any remaining time will be used to continue the conversation on mobile learning and anticipated next steps from the unique perspectives of different educational stakeholders.

Workshop Description:

Main Goal/Objectives:

We can see a strong trend that the emerging generation is increasingly reliant on mobile devices (Pomerantz & Brooks, 2017). Mobile learning has been identified as a promising market for the education industry, as technology improves standards have emerged and the increase of mobile use/devices continues to extend the reach of the education industry (Habboush, Nassuora, & Hussein, 2011).

At the same time, self-management skills play an essential role in their life-long learning. Self-management refers to the extent an individual feels he or she is self-disciplined and can engage in autonomous learning (Smith, Murphy, & Mahoney, 2003). Students who have good self-management skills are more likely to achieve better academic (Duckworth & Seligman, 2005) and occupational (Daly, Delaney, Egan, & Baumeister, 2015; Roberts, Kuncel, Shiner, Caspi, & Goldberg, 2007) success. Research suggests that in order to help learners achieve better mobile learning performance more attention should be given to mobile learning designs that address learners with different levels of self-management (Huang 2014).

This workshop will look to understand, how can we take advantage of the mobile trend and technology to foster learners’ self-management skills? The participants who attend this session can look forward to the following:

  • An overview of the latest student mobile device usage for learning

  • Methods to foster students’ self-management skills

  • Design-based research framework

  • Guidance for mobile application design: benefits and challenges

  • A self-developed mobile solution designed with core learning research and design principles.


Workshop skill-set/ Intended audience:

  • This workshop will be of interest and beneficial to faculty members, instructional and learning designers, educational researchers, and anyone else interested in mobile learning, research, design, and product development in the educational context.
  • In an effort to accommodate for participants with all levels of expertise, our session will include a foundational review of learning design and research in producing effective and meaningful learning experiences.


Workshop Structure & Outline:

  • The workshop will be moderated through a presentation to share fundamental information regarding mobile learning and learning design research. Following the presentation, participants will be asked to participate in an object-based activity.
  • The tentative outline is described below:
    • Introduction of Self-Management Skills and its importance to students’ future success
    • Current State Conversation on Mobile Learning & Student Trends associated with Mobile Use
    • Explanation of the role of research and design in designing effective learning experiences
    • Conversation on the Dos & Don’ts of designing Mobile Learning Experiences
    • Activity to facilitate participants in creating their own mobile learning experience that will support students’ self-management skills
    • Concluded by a candid conversation on what’s next for mobile learning


Workshop Activity/Engagement Plan

  • During the session, participants will be asked to participate in a design activity to create their own mobile learning experience based on a series of learning design principles and research. The activity will take participants through a series of steps, aiding them to think through key questions to facilitate their mobile design (Gipple & Lord, 2013):
    • Who is the target audience?
    • What is your budget?
    • What is the intended purpose of the application?
    • What are the learning use cases and problem statement?
    • What skills are you focusing on?
    • What are the required features aligned to these use cases and problem statements?
    • How will your mobile learning experience help position your target audience for future success?
    • What challenges might you face?
    • How do you plan to address those challenges?


Workshop Materials & Supplies

  • For this workshop, we will require a projector to display our presentation slides. Additionally, we will also supply participants with handouts, markers, and pens to help them in the design activity portion of the session.


References

  • Daly, M., Delaney, L., Egan, M., & Baumeister, R. F. (2015). Childhood self-control and unemployment throughout the life span: Evidence from two British cohort studies. Psychological science, 26(6), 709-723.
  • Duckworth, A. L., & Seligman, M. E. (2005). Self-discipline outdoes IQ in predicting academic performance of adolescents. Psychological science, 16(12), 939-944.
  • Gipple, J., & Lord, E. (2013). Understanding Mobile Learning and Best Practices. ICS Learning Group.
  • Habboush, A., Nassuora, A., & Hussein, A. R. (2011). Acceptance of mobile learning by university students. American Journal of Scientific Research, 22, 119-122.
  • Huang, R. T. (2014). Exploring the moderating role of self-management of learning in mobile English learning.
  • Pomerantz, J., and Brooks, D. C. (2017). ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2017. Research report. Louisville, CO: ECAR, October 2017.
  • Roberts, B. W., Kuncel, N. R., Shiner, R., Caspi, A., & Goldberg, L. R. (2007). The power of personality: The comparative validity of personality traits, socioeconomic status, and cognitive ability for predicting important life outcomes. Perspectives on Psychological science, 2(4), 313-345.
  • Smith, P. J., Murphy, K. L., & Mahoney, S. E. (2003). Towards identifying factors underlying readiness for online learning: An exploratory study. Distance education, 24(1), 57-67.