Proposal Title

Game-Based Learning in a Public Health Course

Session Type

Interactive Presentation

Session Location

University Hall 1060

Start Date

30-5-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

30-5-2019 3:00 PM

Key Terms

Game-based learning

Brief Abstract

Game-based learning can enhance learning in a variety of ways, but creating these experience can seem out of reach for many university instructors (Lepper & Malone, 1987). This presentation looks at a case of implementing game-based learning in a masters-level public health course.

Proposal

Game-based learning can enhance learning in a variety of ways, but creating these experience can seem out of reach for many university instructors (Lepper & Malone, 1987). Paired with instructional design best practices, an authoring tool like Articulate Storyline allows instructors to quickly develop game-based activities and interactions, create branch logic, embed a variety of media, assess performance and push this data to an LMS. This presentation looks at a case of game-based learning in a masters level public health course and more broadly at the trend to create this type of interactive online content in health sciences schools.

In partnership with two Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health professors, the Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) created a game-based assessment and study tool. Preliminary data has shown positive student satisfaction and user experience. In this presentation, we will review current research on game-based learning and discuss functionalities of authoring tools, UX consideration, workflows for developing content, the use of SCORM to pass scores to an LMS, and the ways CTLs can support faculty in their own efforts to create this kind of content. Participants will be given the opportunity to plan a learning object and develop a storyboard/wireframe.

Lepper, M. R., & Malone, T. W. (1987). Making learning fun: A taxonomy of intrinsic motivations for learning. Aptitude, learning, and instruction. Conative and Affective Process Analysis, 3.

Presenter Website

https://www1.columbia.edu/sec/ccnmtl/remote/static/learningobjects/stream/GarberBowers/Wash/story_html5.html

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May 30th, 2:15 PM May 30th, 3:00 PM

Game-Based Learning in a Public Health Course

University Hall 1060

Game-based learning can enhance learning in a variety of ways, but creating these experience can seem out of reach for many university instructors (Lepper & Malone, 1987). Paired with instructional design best practices, an authoring tool like Articulate Storyline allows instructors to quickly develop game-based activities and interactions, create branch logic, embed a variety of media, assess performance and push this data to an LMS. This presentation looks at a case of game-based learning in a masters level public health course and more broadly at the trend to create this type of interactive online content in health sciences schools.

In partnership with two Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health professors, the Columbia Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) created a game-based assessment and study tool. Preliminary data has shown positive student satisfaction and user experience. In this presentation, we will review current research on game-based learning and discuss functionalities of authoring tools, UX consideration, workflows for developing content, the use of SCORM to pass scores to an LMS, and the ways CTLs can support faculty in their own efforts to create this kind of content. Participants will be given the opportunity to plan a learning object and develop a storyboard/wireframe.

Lepper, M. R., & Malone, T. W. (1987). Making learning fun: A taxonomy of intrinsic motivations for learning. Aptitude, learning, and instruction. Conative and Affective Process Analysis, 3.

https://digitalcommons.montclair.edu/eldc/2019/Thursday/2