Date of Award

5-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

College/School

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department/Program

Psychology

Subject(s)

Stress (Psychology), College students

Abstract

This study was designed to extend the Job Demands-Resources model of stress and motivation (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2001b) on a number of student outcomes including strain, burnout, well-being, engagement, satisfaction, commitment, and academic success. In line with the model, it was predicted that student demands and student resources would have main effects on outcomes and that student resources would moderate the relationship between demands and outcomes. A sample of 365 undergraduate students at a mid-sized university participated by filling out an on-line survey. Hypotheses were tested using regression analyses. Results demonstrated general support for the idea that student demands influence outcomes. Specifically, demands are negatively associated with strain, burnout, well-being, engagement, satisfaction, commitment, and academic success. Results also demonstrated general support for the idea that student resources influence outcomes. Specifically, increased internal resources (autonomy, competence, and active coping) are positively associated with GPA, satisfaction, commitment, and engagement, while negatively associated with strain. Additionally, external resources (social support, campus resources, professor feedback, and decision making) are positively associated with well-being, satisfaction, and engagement, and negatively associated with strain. However, there was little support for the idea that resources moderate the relationship between demands and outcomes. In fact, in the two significant interactions, it was found that increases in internal resources and increases in demands predict increases in well-being and strain. Study results suggest that the JD-R model is useful for understanding student stress. The model can be helpful to college administrators in better understanding the influence of student demands and student resources on stress and motivation related outcomes and help them pinpoint what areas of student demands and internal/extemal resources require enhancement.

File Format

PDF

Included in

Psychology Commons

Share

COinS