Date of Award

1-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

College/School

College of Education and Human Services

Department/Program

Family and Child Studies

Thesis Sponsor/Dissertation Chair/Project Chair

Chih-Yuan Steven Lee

Committee Member

Sara E. Goldstein

Committee Member

Soyoung Lee

Subject(s)

College students--Mental health, College students--Psychology, College students--Family relationships

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between familism and psychological well-being using an ethnically diverse sample of 636 college-attending young adults. Specifically, this study examined whether familism was related to depressive symptoms and life satisfaction directly, as well as indirectly through family support and conformity to parental expectations. The moderating role of gender in the proposed associations was also explored. PROCESS was employed to test the proposed multiple mediation and moderated mediation models. The results showed that the relationship between familism and depressive symptoms was not direct, but indirect through family support and conformity to parental expectations. Familism was related to life satisfaction directly, as well as indirectly through family support, but not through conformity to parental expectations. The results also showed that gender moderated the positive relationship between family support and life satisfaction, in that this relationship was greater for women than for men. The findings highlighted the protective role of family support in college-attending young adults’ psychological well-being, particularly in female young adults’ life satisfaction. Limitations and implications for families and helping professionals were discussed.

File Format

PDF

Share

COinS