Title

The Consumption of (Over?) Consumption: Diplomatic Developmentalisms, Market Developmentalism, and the Making of Brazil's ‘American Century’

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-2011

Journal / Book Title

International History Review

Abstract

In this article, ‘Development’ and developmentist ideas, two increasingly fashionable areas of historical inquiry, are explored in the context of relations between the United States and Brazil through the middle decades of the twentieth century, with three arguments made along the way. First, and in contrast to much academic and extra-academic received wisdom (as well as the official pronouncements of US diplomats), the United States government offered no singular or consistent approach to ‘development’ in its dealings with Brazil. Second, an unofficial vision of development (here termed ‘market developmentalism’) that has so far eluded the attention of historians of developmentalist ideas emerged earlier than the official developmentalisms that have been the main object of historiographic interest to date. Third, this unofficial, largely private, consumption-oriented developmentalism is shown to have enjoyed an outsized influence in Brazil, dwarfing the influence enjoyed by those inconsistent varieties of developmentalism espoused by US diplomats between the 1940s and the 1960s.

Journal ISSN / Book ISBN

0707-5332

Published Citation

Woodard, James P. “The Consumption of (Over?) Consumption: Diplomatic Developmentalisms, Market Developmentalism, and the Making of Brazil’s `American Century’.” The International History Review, vol. 33, no. 1, 2011, p. 65.

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