Title

Demographic Trends of Walkable Cities in the United States

Presentation Type

Event

Start Date

27-4-2019 10:50 AM

End Date

27-4-2019 11:29 AM

Abstract

Walkable cities have become attractive places to live in recent years as they benefit resident’s well-being. Walkable cities have a positive correlation with a population that is young, educated, safe, and healthy. In cities with high-walkability, residents are encouraged to walk more, rather than use a car for each outing, which counters obesity and a sedentary lifestyle, a grim atmosphere, and unsafe surroundings. Most research on walkability and demographics is limited to case studies comparing city neighborhoods, whereas this research encompasses 108 United States cities with a population over 200,000 people. This research goes beyond a city’s walk score, established by Walkscore.com, and finds who lives in the city, if it is safe to be walked, and other factors which may determine a person’s willingness to walk. Walk scores and data on crime rates, obesity rates, age, and educational attainment were collected and tested to find how each correlates with their respective city’s walk score. Results will show that Walkscore.com data does not account for anything but how many errands can be accomplished without a car. Walkscore.com does not account for the characteristics of a walk, such as how interesting, comfortable, safe, or convenient it is to walk. Walkable cities are in demand and as people search for housing they must consider more than the walk score to truly understand the scope of the city.

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Apr 27th, 10:50 AM Apr 27th, 11:29 AM

Demographic Trends of Walkable Cities in the United States

Walkable cities have become attractive places to live in recent years as they benefit resident’s well-being. Walkable cities have a positive correlation with a population that is young, educated, safe, and healthy. In cities with high-walkability, residents are encouraged to walk more, rather than use a car for each outing, which counters obesity and a sedentary lifestyle, a grim atmosphere, and unsafe surroundings. Most research on walkability and demographics is limited to case studies comparing city neighborhoods, whereas this research encompasses 108 United States cities with a population over 200,000 people. This research goes beyond a city’s walk score, established by Walkscore.com, and finds who lives in the city, if it is safe to be walked, and other factors which may determine a person’s willingness to walk. Walk scores and data on crime rates, obesity rates, age, and educational attainment were collected and tested to find how each correlates with their respective city’s walk score. Results will show that Walkscore.com data does not account for anything but how many errands can be accomplished without a car. Walkscore.com does not account for the characteristics of a walk, such as how interesting, comfortable, safe, or convenient it is to walk. Walkable cities are in demand and as people search for housing they must consider more than the walk score to truly understand the scope of the city.