Title

Ancient Rome and its Everlasting Aqueducts

Presenter Information

Jacob Caraballo

Presentation Type

Poster

Faculty Advisor

Deborah Chatr Aryamontri

Access Type

Event

Start Date

26-4-2023 1:44 PM

End Date

26-4-2023 2:45 PM

Description

Throughout the entirety of the Roman empire, engineering was one of the most impressive and important aspects to come out of this period of time. More specifically, aqueducts which were implemented to transport fresh and clean water to multiple areas with high populations of civilians. These grand projects required a lot of time and planning as the engineers of the time had to take multiple things into consideration such as gravity and the slope of certain pipes and tunnels. These same aqueducts can still be seen today all across the world in places such as Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. For instance in Pont du Gard, France, there is a still working aqueduct which crosses the Gard River in southern France. This channel, spanning 31 miles in length, was once utilized to transport water to the town of Nimes which lay a ways away from the Mediterranean Sea. Another remarkable aqueduct still up today is the one located in Spain. This aqueduct is one of the last ones remaining which served the Roman city of Tarraco. Most of it fell after the fall of the Roman Empire, but some managed to miraculously survive. Many of those who ruled during the duration of Roman rule ordered that these aqueducts be constructed. Despite their age and how long ago they were made, these very same passageways still function with their original and proper use, supplying modern day Rome with fresh and clean water. Without these constructions, many people of ancient Rome would have been cut off and not had the opportunity to pristine water which would have ultimately impacted their way of life and may have had lasting effects on their health too. I believe that these ancient aqueducts that are still around today and still function with no problem tell the ages of time and how truly advanced they were back then in which the mass population of people today may glance and brush over. It is easy to assume that they just got their water from any nearby source, when in reality, the engineers of the time went through great difficulty to finely craft these passageways and tunnels to deliver water to people who did not have access to it. These aqueducts are time capsules into the past that I very well believe deserve to be highlighted more.

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Apr 26th, 1:44 PM Apr 26th, 2:45 PM

Ancient Rome and its Everlasting Aqueducts

Throughout the entirety of the Roman empire, engineering was one of the most impressive and important aspects to come out of this period of time. More specifically, aqueducts which were implemented to transport fresh and clean water to multiple areas with high populations of civilians. These grand projects required a lot of time and planning as the engineers of the time had to take multiple things into consideration such as gravity and the slope of certain pipes and tunnels. These same aqueducts can still be seen today all across the world in places such as Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. For instance in Pont du Gard, France, there is a still working aqueduct which crosses the Gard River in southern France. This channel, spanning 31 miles in length, was once utilized to transport water to the town of Nimes which lay a ways away from the Mediterranean Sea. Another remarkable aqueduct still up today is the one located in Spain. This aqueduct is one of the last ones remaining which served the Roman city of Tarraco. Most of it fell after the fall of the Roman Empire, but some managed to miraculously survive. Many of those who ruled during the duration of Roman rule ordered that these aqueducts be constructed. Despite their age and how long ago they were made, these very same passageways still function with their original and proper use, supplying modern day Rome with fresh and clean water. Without these constructions, many people of ancient Rome would have been cut off and not had the opportunity to pristine water which would have ultimately impacted their way of life and may have had lasting effects on their health too. I believe that these ancient aqueducts that are still around today and still function with no problem tell the ages of time and how truly advanced they were back then in which the mass population of people today may glance and brush over. It is easy to assume that they just got their water from any nearby source, when in reality, the engineers of the time went through great difficulty to finely craft these passageways and tunnels to deliver water to people who did not have access to it. These aqueducts are time capsules into the past that I very well believe deserve to be highlighted more.