Start Date

11-9-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

11-10-2018 5:00 PM

Abstract

Bicycling has been promoted as a means to reduce our dependence on climate-warming fossil fuel burning, clean the air in our streets, promote personal health, and fight widespread obesity. It is often postulated that there are obvious environmental benefits associated with increasing participation in cycling as a transportation alternative, since the bicycles’ fuel is the banana and/or the muffin. This presentation will discuss why mass bicycling might not be quite as good for the environment as you may imagine – though it is still very, very good indeed.

Biography

Mark Chopping (M.Phil, University of Cambridge, 1995; Ph.D., University of Nottingham, 1998) joined the Department of Earth and Environmental Studies at Montclair State University in 2002. He has served on several NASA Science Teams and is currently a member of the NASA MISR Science Team, and the NASA Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Science Team. His research interests include the interpretation of remote sensing data with canopy reflectance and BRDF models for vegetation mapping, with foci in arid and semi-arid regions, western grasslands and forests, and Arctic tundra. He also rides a road bike for transportation, fitness, and fun.

Share

COinS
 
Sep 11th, 4:00 PM Oct 11th, 5:00 PM

How Good is Bicycling for the Environment?

Bicycling has been promoted as a means to reduce our dependence on climate-warming fossil fuel burning, clean the air in our streets, promote personal health, and fight widespread obesity. It is often postulated that there are obvious environmental benefits associated with increasing participation in cycling as a transportation alternative, since the bicycles’ fuel is the banana and/or the muffin. This presentation will discuss why mass bicycling might not be quite as good for the environment as you may imagine – though it is still very, very good indeed.