Start Date

27-11-2018 4:00 PM

End Date

27-11-2018 5:00 PM

Abstract

Nearly 3 billion people live within 100 km of the coastline, many in large urban centers. In predictions of sea level rise, the future role of polar ice sheets is one of the most critical uncertainties under the present extreme rise in greenhouse forcing of the climate system. This talk will show how geoscientists address the Earth system processes involved in melting ice sheets under warmer climates, and introduce the objectives of an upcoming deepsea drilling expedition to the area with greatest ice loss in West Antarctica.

Biography

Dr. Passchier has investigated climate archives in sediments near polar ice sheets since 1992 in collaborative research efforts involving expeditions to the Arctic and the Antarctic, including six international deep-sea drilling campaigns. Her current research involves the use of quantitative sedimentological and geochemical methods on marine sediment core samples to unravel 1) the behavior of polar ice sheets under different climate states, and 2) the response of ice–sheets to abrupt changes in atmospheric and oceanic forcing in the past. The results are used by others to improve modeling efforts of future ice sheet melt and sea level rise. Funded by the National Science Foundation ($1.4M to Passchier).

ORCID

0000-0001-7204-7025

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Nov 27th, 4:00 PM Nov 27th, 5:00 PM

How Do Polar Ice Sheets and Sea Level Behave Under a Changing Climate?

Nearly 3 billion people live within 100 km of the coastline, many in large urban centers. In predictions of sea level rise, the future role of polar ice sheets is one of the most critical uncertainties under the present extreme rise in greenhouse forcing of the climate system. This talk will show how geoscientists address the Earth system processes involved in melting ice sheets under warmer climates, and introduce the objectives of an upcoming deepsea drilling expedition to the area with greatest ice loss in West Antarctica.