Proposal Title

A Designer’s Reflections on Designing for ‘Productive Failure’

Session Type

Interactive Presentation

Session Location

University Hall, ADP Center 1143

Start Date

30-5-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

30-5-2019 11:45 AM

Key Terms

Productive Failure, Deeper Learning, Employability, 21st Century, learning Instructional Design, Graduate, immersive learning, simulations.

Brief Abstract

The world is grappling with education failing to meet with industry demands for skills. We’re constantly striving to design for learning that is able to meet with the emerging societal and Industrial needs. Against this background what should the learning design strategy be?

Of particular relevance is Productive Failure (PF) a deeper learning design strategy, which runs counter to a traditional Direct Instruction methodology. In this presentation I share my experience of designing learning experiences informed by PF. Subsequently, Participants assume the role of a learner to get a flavour of PF.

Proposal

Proposal:

The world is grappling with education failing to meet with industry demands for skills. We’re constantly striving to design for learning that is able to meet with the emerging societal and Industrial needs. Against this background what should the learning design strategy be?

Of particular relevance is Productive Failure (PF) a deeper learning design strategy, which runs counter to a traditional Direct Instruction methodology. In PF, challenges are designed to create failure as learning through guided failure brings about higher and deeper learning gains (Kapur, 2008 and 2010). PF replaces early Direct Instruction with real world challenges which require learners to offer potential solutions by activating their intuitive experiences, informal knowledge, and reasoning.

This session will be divided in 3 parts. First, we look at the theoretical basis of designing for failure, then I share my experience of designing learning experiences informed by PF. Finally, in groups, participants assume the role of a learner, explore and generate ideas using a NetLogo model. The session wraps up with a de-brief aimed to help participants prepare the ground to design for failure.

Author Bio:

Nilanjana, is a learning design professional, having worked on the implementation of innovative educational & training delivery solutions in a variety of settings. She started her career as a school teacher teaching Chemistry and running summer science camps. Her interest in education innovation took her to Australia where she read the Masters in Learning Sciences & Technology from the University of Sydney.

Currently, she is working as a Learning Design Professional at a Higher Education Institution in Singapore.

Nilanjana enjoys reading, traveling, cooking, rambling and trying out new experiences, the most recent being learning Street Salsa.

Presenter Website

https://www.linkedin.com/in/nilanjanasaxena/

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May 30th, 11:00 AM May 30th, 11:45 AM

A Designer’s Reflections on Designing for ‘Productive Failure’

University Hall, ADP Center 1143

Proposal:

The world is grappling with education failing to meet with industry demands for skills. We’re constantly striving to design for learning that is able to meet with the emerging societal and Industrial needs. Against this background what should the learning design strategy be?

Of particular relevance is Productive Failure (PF) a deeper learning design strategy, which runs counter to a traditional Direct Instruction methodology. In PF, challenges are designed to create failure as learning through guided failure brings about higher and deeper learning gains (Kapur, 2008 and 2010). PF replaces early Direct Instruction with real world challenges which require learners to offer potential solutions by activating their intuitive experiences, informal knowledge, and reasoning.

This session will be divided in 3 parts. First, we look at the theoretical basis of designing for failure, then I share my experience of designing learning experiences informed by PF. Finally, in groups, participants assume the role of a learner, explore and generate ideas using a NetLogo model. The session wraps up with a de-brief aimed to help participants prepare the ground to design for failure.

Author Bio:

Nilanjana, is a learning design professional, having worked on the implementation of innovative educational & training delivery solutions in a variety of settings. She started her career as a school teacher teaching Chemistry and running summer science camps. Her interest in education innovation took her to Australia where she read the Masters in Learning Sciences & Technology from the University of Sydney.

Currently, she is working as a Learning Design Professional at a Higher Education Institution in Singapore.

Nilanjana enjoys reading, traveling, cooking, rambling and trying out new experiences, the most recent being learning Street Salsa.

https://digitalcommons.montclair.edu/eldc/2019/Thursday/7